Lombok's Setanggor village, a must-visit for cultural enthusiasts

As most of its residents are farmers, the village is home to agritourism and culinary sites where visitors can expect to witness locals farming and cultivating crops, such as buah naga or dragon fruit, and later enjoy dishes made using what has been harvested.
Photo: The Jakarta Post/ANN

Situated 9 kilometers away from Lombok International Airport, Setanggor village in Praya Barat district, Central Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara, may not have gorgeous beaches to swim in or challenging mountains to hike, but it still offers plenty of interesting activities for tourists.

As most of its residents are farmers, the village is home to agritourism and culinary sites where visitors can expect to witness locals farming and cultivating crops, such as buah naga or dragon fruit, and later enjoy dishes made using what has been harvested.

A weaver uses traditional weaving equipment at the weaving center in Setanggor village on Jan. 15.Photo: The Jakarta Post/ANN

Setanggor also features cultural tourism places such as sanggar or traditional music and dance space that invites visitors to watch various local entertainment.

"Many tourists enjoy learning to dance or play traditional instruments in this sanggar," Ida Wahyuni, 29, who had initiated the tourism village concept, told The Jakarta Post at the village on Sunday.

Setanggor's sanggar also has another unique attraction, which is an ancient 1-meter diameter gong.

Made in 1828, the gong is kept in a 1.5 m by 1.5 m closed room.

"This gong can make a sound on its own during certain times. This is related to the fact that the location is near to the tomb of Raden Kekah, a prominent Muslim missionary to Lombok. [That's why] this place has become a religious tourism site," said Ida.

Foreign tourists join locals playing gamelan at the 'sanggar' (traditional music and dance space) in Setanggor village.Photo: The Jakarta Post/ANN

Other areas of Setanggor are home to a weaving art centre, where visitors can purchase accessories and see local women weave Lombok's signature woven cloth using local patterns.

Almost 90 per cent of women in the village, which in total has around 4,606 residents, reportedly can weave and have been able to for generations.

The weaving centre itself was established only four months ago to boost the local economy.

"I think this village should be promoted since it has the potential to become Lombok's new destination," said Lala Haerul, 23, a student of Yogyakarta's Gadjah Mada University who visited the place on Sunday. 

Foreign visitors dance together with local dancers at the 'sanggar' in Setanggor village.Photo: The Jakarta Post

 

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